TUESDAY 18
goos
Evangelia MARKIDOU
Head of Sector – Artificial Intelligence Technology, Deployment and Impact at European Commission

 


goos
Lucia Pallottino
University of Pisa

 


Saskia
Saskia Maresch
DIN

 


Saskia
Roberto Conti
IUVO

 


Renteria
Arantxa Renteria
Tecnalia

 


pardo
Maximo di Pardo
Centro di Ricerca FIAT

 


Diego
Alessandro Cacciatore
Stellantis – C.R.F. S.C.p.A


Diego
Diego Torricelli
Neural Rehabilitation Group at Cajal Institute, CSIC

ferro
Francesco Ferro
PAL Robotics

Vitielo
Nicola Vitiello
Associate Professor at Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Co-Founder & Advisor of IUVO Srl

glasewald
Georg Glasewald
YUANDA robotics



glasewald
Igor Aristizabal
Tecnalia

Bonadio
Enrico Bonadio
Senior Lecturer in Law at The City Law School

 

WEDNESDAY 19
Leimbach
Thorsten Leimbach
Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems IAIS, Germany

Leimbach
Emily Sisamou
ENGINO


glasewald
Sylvie Bove
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden

glasewald
Björn Arvidsson
Managing Director at STUNS Life Science at Uppsala University



glasewald
Jakob Hellman
Head of IT at The Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems



glasewald
Björn-Erik Erlandsson
Professor, Senior Advisor

 

THURSDAY 20
glasewald
Vagelis Papakonstantinou



glasewald
Fabio Bonsignorio
Heron Robots

glasewald
Bernd Bertelmann
Policy officer, European Commission, DG JUSTICE

glasewald
Vincent Müller
University of Leeds/Technical University of Eindhoven/Alan Turing Institute

 

Title: What is hot in AI ethics?
Abstract: It is clear that we should not do everything with AI that we could do – as is the case with other technologies as well. So “ethics of AI” has dealt with a number of concerns, from privacy, fake news and autonomous weapons to the end of humanity. What are the truly important issues that we should work on? I will try to give a short survey and propose an order into theoretically and practically important themes.


glasewald
Fiachra O’Brolchain
Dublin City University

glasewald
Daniel W. Linna Jr.
Northwestern Pritzker School of Law & McCormick School of Engineering.
Senior Lecturer & Director of Law and Technology Initiatives
 
Title: From Regulating Technology to Empowering People: Developing and Evaluating Software Systems that Provide Legal Information

Abstract:

To ensure accountability and compliance, software systems will require machine readable forms of laws and regulations. Increasingly capable software systems can also provide legal information and advice to people, including to help them act proactively to prevent problems. We must reimagine law and the rule of law in a digital world. Our goal should be to provide 100% of people with access to legal information and advice. To achieve this goal, technologists, legal researchers, and others must work together to jointly develop rigorous, reproducible methodologies for designing, implementing, and validating accountable software systems that provide legal information and advice to people.


glasewald
Carlos Trias Pintó
European economic and Social Committee

goos
Maarten Goos
Universiteit Utrecht

Title: Automation, New jobs and Inequality: Policy Implications


goos
José Ignacio López Sánchez
Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Title: The impact of robotics and computerization on the labour market. Automation and inequality: does a relation exist?

Abstract:

First, analysing the evolution of robots in the world in order to draw initial conclusions regarding the behaviour of some countries, then verify if countries with a higher density of robots per worker are countries whose jobs have a lower risk of being replaced by automation and are more competitive. A time-series clustering algorithm allows us to identify four different clusters based on similar evolution over the studied period. We have can observe empirical evidence that that those countries that have a higher density of robots, per worker, generally have a lower unemployment rate. Similarly, we can observe empirical evidence that those countries whose workers are more productive present a lower risk of automation of their jobs. Automation itself is not bad. In fact, countries with a higher productivity per worker are countries whose jobs have a lower risk of being replaced by automation.

Secondly, we identify the capabilities and skills demanded in the expected positions in the coming years. We make a first approximation to the jobs that could be destroyed, but also that will be created. Jobs requiring physical and manual skills, and basic cognitive skills will be the first to be automated; while the most demanding jobs will require social, emotional and technological skills. Through data analysis and the extrapolations made (2016-2030) we can conclude that United States would lose 9,730,337 jobs but would need 21,179,775 new jobs (higher cognitive skills, social and emotional skills, and technological skills). The net balance would be an increase of 11,449,438 jobs. Western Europe would lose 18,792,969 jobs, but would need 27,605,046 new jobs. The net balance would be an increase of 8,812,077 jobs. Western Europe would lose many more jobs than the United States, and would not recover them in the same proportion.

And third, using a sample of 33 European countries in the period 2000-2016, this paper analyses the relationship between economic inequality, measured by the Gini index, and the automation level, evaluated according to the number of robots per 10,000 workers. Using a panel data approach, the conclusion is that higher levels of automation lead to a reduction in inequality in the medium term. The explanation for this phenomenon can be found in the fact that automation increases wealth in the country, which can be used by governments to reduce inequality through redistributive policies.


glasewald
María-Luz Vega
International Labour Organization

glasewald
Roberto Suárez-Santos
International Organization of Employers (IOE)

luke
Luke McDonagh
Senior Lecturer in the Law School at City, University of London

rita
Rita de la Feria
University of Leeds

glasewald
Santiago Mediano
Madrid Bar Association

franco
Franco Roccatagliata
EU Tax Law professor at the College of Europe and visiting professor in various other universities; principal administrator at the European Commission (DG TAXUD)

amparo
Amparo Grau
UCM